Caught-in or -between tools or equipment


Problem:

Workers that cut, thread, hammer and bend pipes and vessel tubes may face hazards from getting caught-in or -between tools or equipment.


Risk Description:

Caught-in or -between tools or equipment incidents may result in crushing injuries between objects or pinch points, especially without safeguards in place.  A variety of crushing injuries, fractures, and other injuries can result from getting caught in the compression action of a tool or equipment.

Injuries can occur from being compressed or crushed between rolling, sliding, or shifting objects such as semi-trailers and a wall.  Being pulled into or caught in machinery and equipment also includes strangulation as the result of clothing caught in running machinery and equipment.


Level of Risk:

In The Construction Chart Book 5th edition published by CPWR, Chapter 43 shows "contact with objects", which includes caught in or compressed by equipment or objects, is the third leading cause of construction fatalities (graph 43a) and the second leading cause of construction nonfatal injuries resulting in days away from work in 2010 (graph 43b).


Assessment Info:

Assessment for getting caught-in or -between tools or equipment should be an integral part of the site safety planning process.

To assess the likelihood of this hazard, here are general items that can increase the risk:

  • If tools or equipment have rotating, reciprocating (transverse) motions or in-running nip points
  • If a worker is wearing loose clothing that can be grabbed and wind up within the tool's or equipment's "danger point"
  • If a worker is not familiar or trained properly for the safe operation of the tool or equipment
  • If applicable, when a safeguard is not used or removed during the operation of the tool or equipment

 


Regulations & Standards:

Regulations adopted by a state must be at least as protective as the corresponding federal standard. Work may also be subject to rules of other federal, state and local agencies. Even where there is no hazard specific standard, OSHA provides a general duty for the employer to provide a work site free from recognized hazards.

Federal OSHA Standards are enforced by the U.S. Department of Labor in 26 states. There are currently 22 states and jurisdictions operating complete State plans (covering both the private sector and state and local government employees) and 5 - Connecticut, Illinois, New Jersey, New York and the Virgin Islands - which cover public employees only. If you are working in one of those states or jurisdictions you should ensure that you are complying with their requirements.

Federal OSHA Standards are enforced by the U.S. Department of Labor in 26 states. There are currently 22 states and jurisdictions operating complete State plans (covering both the private sector and state and local government employees) and 5 - Connecticut, Illinois, New Jersey, New York and the Virgin Islands - which cover public employees only. If you are working in one of those states or jurisdictions you should ensure that you are complying with their requirements.