Stationary Masonry Saw with Vacuum Dust Collection

Hand-held masonry saws with LEV capture silica and other construction dust at the source by drawing the dust into a vacuum receptacle.

Description:

Cutting bricks, blocks, stone, concrete and other masonry materials generates a large amount of dust that may contain high levels of crystalline silica and create a hazard for everyone in the vicinity.  Vacuum dust controls exist for both gas and electric stationary masonry saws.  These controls consist of a vacuum, hood (also called a shroud) vacuum hose and a disposable filter.  The vacuum draws air and dust from the blade, the point of dust generation, into the dust collector, and transports it through the hose to the vacuum's bag or reservoir.  A system with an auto-cleaning mechanism and a static pressure gauge can help ensure the system is operating efficiently and effectively.

EDCO electric (Model GMS-10-1.5B) and gasoline (Models GMS-10-4H and GMS-10-5.5H) hardscape masonry saws and 10-inch blade with Edco Vortex 200 vacuum

EDCO electric (Model HSS-14-1.5B) and gasoline (Models HSS-14-5.5H and HSS-14-6.5H) hardscape masonry saws and 14-inch blade with Edco Vortex 200 vacuum

EDCO electric (Model BB-14-1.5B) and gasoline (Models BB-14-5.5H, BB-14-6.5H and BB-14-9H) masonry saws and 14-inch blade with Edco Vortex 200 vacuum

EDCO electric (Models MS-20-5B and MS-20-7.5H) gasoline (GMS-20-9H and GMS-20-11H) masonry saws with 20-inch blade with Edco Vortex 200 vacuum

Compatible Jack Vac 2000 dust collection systems and JVT-20 dust collection table for MK Diamond stationary masonry saws

Jack Vac 1000X1 Jack Vac dust collection system includes MK BX-4 14" Saw with Edco Vortex 200 vacuum

EDCO, Inc. electric (Model GMS-10-1.5B) and gasoline (Models GMS-10-4H and GMS-10-5.5H) hardscape masonry saws and 10-inch blade with Edco Vortex 200 Vacuum

 

  • Used for cutting interlocking pavers, brick and stone or brick veneers, stepping and cultured stones
  • Maximum cutting depth: 3 5/8 inches
  • Blade speed: 3,450 RPM
  • Alternative dust control: hose connection for wet cutting
  • Sound pressure level: gasoline powered model exceeds 92 dBA (OSHA’s Permissible Exposure Limit for an 8-hour time-weighted average is 90 dBA)
  • Weight of saw: 131 pounds
  • Vacuum take-off diameter: 2 inches
  • Compatible vacuums for dust collection during dry cutting: EDCO, Inc. vacuums (VAC-120, Vortex-200, Vortex-290, and Vortex-300); please see below for details
Models Costs Power Requirements Horsepower
GMS-10-1.5B $2,455 115 volts, 14 amps or 230 volts, 7 amps 1.5
GMS-10-4H $2,472 gasoline 4
GMS-10-5.5H $2,573 gasoline 5.

(verified 11/2009)

EDCO, Inc. electric (Model HSS-14-1.5B) and gasoline (Models HSS-14-5.5H and HSS-14-6.5H) hardscape masonry saws and 14-inch blade with Edco Vortex 200 Vacuum

  • Used for cutting interlocking pavers, bricks, stepping and cultured stones, including 4" retaining wall block and brick
  • Maximum cutting depth: 4 ½ inches
  • Alternative dust control: hose connection for wet cutting included
  • Sound pressure levels: Not available but likely to exceed 85 dBA (OSHA’s Permissible Exposure Limit for an 8-hour time-weighted average is 90 dBA)
  • Weight of saw: 155 pounds
  • Vacuum take-off diameter: 2 inches
  • Compatible vacuums for dust collection during dry cutting: EDCO, Inc. vacuums (VAC-120, Vortex-200, Vortex-290, and Vortex-300); please see below for details
Models Costs Power Requirements Horsepower Blade Speed, RPM
Hss-14-1.5B $2,797 115 volts, 14 amps or 230 volts, 7amps 1.5 3,450
Hss-14-1.5.5H $2,980 gasoline 5.5 3,600
Hss-10-6.5H $3,107 gasoline 6.5 3,600

(verified 11/2009)

EDCO, Inc. electric (Model BB-14-1.5B) and gasoline (Models BB-14-5.5H, BB-14-6.5H and BB-14-9H) masonry saws and 14-inch blade with Edco Vortex 200 Vacuum

  • Used for cutting interlocking pavers, bricks, stepping and cultured stones, and will accommodate 16" blocks
  • Maximum cutting depth: 5 inches
  • Alternative dust control: hose connection for wet cutting included
  • Sound pressure levels: exceeds 92 dBA (OSHA’s Permissible Exposure Limit for an 8-hour time-weighted average is 90 dBA)
  • Vacuum take-off diameter: 2 inches
  • Compatible vacuums for dust collection during dry cutting: EDCO, Inc. vacuums (VAC-120, Vortex-200, Vortex-290, and Vortex-300); please see below for details
Models Costs Power Requirements Horsepower Blade Speed, RPM Weight, pounds
BB-14-1.5B $1,775 115 volts, 18.8 amps or 230 volts, 9.4 amps 1.5 3,450 165
BB-14-5.5H $2,749 gasoline 5.5 3,600 175
BB-14-6.5H $2,863 gasoline 6.5 3,600 175
BB-10-9H $3,288 gasoline 9 3,600 175

(verified 11/2009)
  
EDCO, Inc. electric (Models MS-20-5B and MS-20-7.5H) gasoline (GMS-20-9H and GMS-20-11H) masonry saws with 20-inch blade with Edco Vortex 200 Vacuum

  • Used for cutting interlocking pavers, bricks, stepping and cultured stones
  • Maximum cutting depth: 8 inches
  • Alternative dust control: belt driven diaphragm water pump for wet cutting is standard
  • Sound pressure levels: exceeds 92 dBA (OSHA’s Permissible Exposure Limit for an 8-hour time-weighted average is 90 dBA)
  • Vacuum take-off diameter: 2 inches
  • Compatible vacuums for dust collection during dry cutting: EDCO, Inc. vacuums (VAC-120, Vortex-200, Vortex-290, and Vortex-300); please see below for details
Models Costs Power Requirements Horsepower Blade Speed, RPM Weight, pounds
MS-20-5B $4,914 230 volts, 19.5 amps, 1 phase;  230 volts, 12 amps, 3 phases;  460 volts, 6 amps, 3phases 5 3,450 440
MS-20-7.5H $5,051 230 volts, 17.4 amps, 3 phases;  460 volts, 8.7 amps, 3 phases 7.5 3,600 455
GMS-20-9H $5,075 gasoline 9 2,400 480
GMS-20-11H $5,375 gasoline 11 2,400 480

(verified 11/2009)

EDCO Vortex 200 and other compatible vacuums: Vortex-290 and Vortex-300

  • The EDCO shrouds cover less than half of the blade and the rotation of the saw blade pushes air and dust down toward 1-inch square tube below the blade instead of up and into the shroud.  The dust is drawn through a slot in the 1-inch tube then through the tube to the back of the saw and into the vacuum.
  • Filtration: main filter removes approximately 98 percent of particles; alternatively, a HEPA filter kit can be purchased for $500 to $1,400, depending on the vacuum model.  HEPA filters capture 99.97% of the most penetrating particles.
Models
Costs
Air Flow Rates, cubic feet per minute
Static Pressure, inches of water
Dust Capacity, gallons
Available Hose Diameters, inches
Filter Area, square feet*
Power Requirements
Weight, pounds
Vortex-200 $2,765 200 94 9 1.5 or 2 13 120 volts, 16 amps 90
Vortex-290 $4,308 290 75 9 3 28 120 volts, 19 amps 169
Vortex-300 $9,625 300 95 9 3 28 gasoline 285

(verified 11/2009)

* greater area allows more time between filter cleaning or replacement

Compatible Jack Vac 2000 dust collection systems and JVT-20 dust collection table for MK Diamond stationary masonry saws

      

  • Compatible with 20-inch stationary masonry saws manufactured by MK Diamond Products and EDCO, Inc.
  • Cost of JVT-20 dust collection table: $2,351 (verified 11/2009)
  • Diameter of hose inlets: one 4-inch inlet, two 6-inch inlets
  • Static pressure: 8 inches of water
  • Filtration: standard filter removes approximately 98 percent of particles; HEPA filter kit can be purchased for approximately $800 and replacement HEPA filters can be purchased for $400
  • Filter area: 144 square feet (greater area allows more time between filter cleaning or replacement)
  • Dust capacity: 1.5 cubic feet   
Models
Costs
Air Flow Rates, cubic feet per minute
Horsepower
Power Requirements
Weight, pounds
Sound Level, dBA
JV-2003 S $7,868 1,700 3 220 volts, 15 amps, 1 phase 400 83
JV-2007 T $8,170 4,000 7.5 480 volts, 9.2 amps, 3 phase 430 85
JV-2013 G $8,525 4,000 13 gasoline 430 85

(verified 10/2011)   

Jack Vac 1000X1 Jack Vac dust collection system includes MK BX-4 14" Saw

  • Includes an MK Diamond Products, Inc. BX-4 stationary masonry saw as one unit
  • Cost: $5,895 (verified 10/2011)
  • Max Air Flow Rate: 1,000 cubic feet per minute
  • Static pressure: 8 inches of water
  • Filtration: main filter removes approximately 98 percent of particles
  • Filter area: 60 square feet (greater area allows more time between filter cleaning or replacement)
  • Dust capacity: 1 cubic foot
  • Horsepower: 2.5
  • Power requirements: 220 volts, 1 phase, 15 amps
  • Weight: 200 pounds
  • Sound pressure level: 83 dBA (OSHA’s Permissible Exposure Limit for an 8-hour time-weighted average is 90 dBA)

Risks Addressed:

Silica dust exposure may cause silicosis or lung scarring with prolonged exposure.  Silicosis is an incurable, sometimes fatal, disease.  Exposure to silica also causes lung cancer and other lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and tuberculosis, and has been linked to renal disease and rheumatoid arthritis.  "At work sites without dust controls for [stationary masonry saws], studies have found that employee silica exposures can be as high as 20 times the Occupational Safety and Health Adminstration's (OSHA) benchmark of 0.1 mg/m3."  (Controlling Silica Exposure in Construction, 2009)


How Risks are Reduced:

Vacuum systems capture dust and silica near the source, reducing concentrations in the worker's breathing zone.  A vacuum attached to a fixed-blade saw pulls dust from the cutting point through special fittings connecteddirectly to the saw.  A vacuum attached to a plunge-cut saw collects the dust through a connection at the back of the saw, and a hood or shroud is mounted to the back of the saw to capture the dust.  As long as the dust does not become airborne, the hazard is reduced.  Silica and dust are only hazardous if inhaled and are not hazardous for skin contact.  In some cases, a vacuum dust control may be adequate to reduce the need to wear a respirator, and the need for an employer respiratory protection program.

When a stationary masonry saw with vacuum dust collection (VDC) is used properly a worker’s exposure to dust, including silica dust, can be significantly reduced. 

For example: Under experimental conditions in an enclosed, ventilated test area, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) found that “a VDC system for a fixed-blade saw reduced short-term (15-minute) exposures by 80-95 percent when compared to uncontrolled masonry cutting.”  The testing conditions, however, “produced unusually high levels of dust in the test area… and uncontrolled silica exposure levels in the study were considerably greater than those observed in actual construction industry exposure assessment studies.  Consequently, use of the VDC system in an actual construction setting could reduce silica exposure levels below OSHA limits (Croteau, 2000; Croteau et al., 2002).”  (“Controlling Silica Exposures in Construction – OSHA 3362-04, 2009)

The performance of the EDCO, Inc. GMS-10 gasoline powered stationary masonry saw with a 10-inch blade, and used with the EDCO vacuum was tested in a study described in a peer reviewed journal. Croteau et al. observed between 70 and 95 percent reduction in respirable dust exposure, depending on ventilation rate, and concluded that “local exhaust ventilation can substantially reduce respirable dust and crystalline silica exposures during concrete cutting” activities in a controlled field setting.


Effects on Productivity:

Vacuum dust control systems create a cleaner work environment, and increase workers’ visibility and comfort when engaged in dust producing tasks.  Improved worker visibility and comfort may in turn result in less fatigue for the worker and greater productivity.   Capturing dust at the source may also eliminate or reduce time spent cleaning up the work site and adjacent property (including cars, etc.).

Other items that may impact productivity include the time spent changing vacuum bags, which will depend on the amount of cutting being done and the size of the vacuum bag or hopper, and the time it takes workers to adapt to working with a vacuum hose attached to the tool.


Additional Considerations:

To achieve maximum dust control and exposure reductions the equipment and vacuum system must be maintained, workers trained on the proper use of the equipment, and use must be in compliance with applicable local, state or federal regulations .   Things to consider:

•    The vacuum must be located as close to the dust generation as possible to be effective.  Appropriate filters must be used. The particles that can do the most damage in the lungs are small enough to penetrate the filters found on many shop vacuums. Additionally, some inexpensive shop vacuums pull the dust through the motors, which can destroy the vacuum on really dusty jobs, eliminating any initial cost savings.
•    For dust containing harmful particles like silica, it is important to use as high efficiency filters as practical. The best available are called HEPA (High Efficiency Particle Air) filters because they capture 99.97% of the most penetrating particles. But HEPA filters also create a greater pressure drop and decrease in air flow rate because it is more difficult to pull air through these denser filters so capture velocity may be reduced. They also require pre-filters to extend the life of the HEPA filters, which are more expensive than other filters. Studies have shown that it may be more effective to direct the exhaust air out of the work area than to attempt to add HEPA filtration for a tool where it isn't an integral part already. HEPAs require routine cleaning or disposal of prefilters, which can cause exposures to those performing the filter maintenance.
•    The larger the diameter of the saw blade, the more difficult it becomes to capture fast moving dust particles.

Some additional considerations:

•    Dust suppression avoids exposing other workers, members of the public, adjacent property, cars and building occupants to silica dust., and reduces the risk of  liability and time-consuming disputes.
•    Large electric vacuums commonly require 20 amp electrical circuits in addition to the 20 amp circuit used for the electric masonry saw.  Cords and extensions must be rated for the tool's power requirements, be inspected regularly, and used in combination with ground fault interrupt circuits.
•    The use of gasoline-powered equipment poses the risk of carbon monoxide exposure, particularly in areas where airflow is reduced. Steps to control exposure are important because the gas is invisible, odorless and tasteless. Small, inexpensive personal monitors can be worn by the operator to warn of unacceptable exposures.
•    Stationary masonry saws frequently generate sound levels that are greater than 90 decibels, the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL), and hazardous. Hearing protection should be worn when using masonry saws unless an industrial hygienist has conducted noise monitoring and indicated that hearing protection is not required.


Hazards Addressed:

Availability

EDCO, Inc. stationary masonry saws with vacuum connection and compatible vacuums
To obtain information, visit http://www.edcoinc.com or contact 1-800-638-3326 info@edcoinc.com

NIOSH Workplace Solutions Sheet
The National Institute of Safety and Health (NIOSH) has published a series of “Workplace Solutions”, which are easy-to-understand recommendations from NIOSH research results. Related to this Construction Solution, please find more information on: Reducing Hazardous Dust Exposure When Cutting Fiber-Cement Siding

Jack Vac compatible vacuums and single-unit vacuum saws
To obtain information, visit http://masonrytecstore.com or contact 1-888-274-7744

Return on Investment

To calculate the return on investment (ROI) for your specific application, please visit our Return on Investment Calculator. While a specific ROI example has not been developed for this particular solution, the ROI Calculator provides a useful tool and guidance on how to generate your own on investment analysis.